Patents

July to Sept 2017 IRP Patent Awardees

HIV-1 GP 120 V1N2 ANTIGENS AND IMMUNOLOGICAL USES THEREOF

Phillip Merman, Distinguished Professor Phillip Merman, Distinguished Professor

Title: Phillip Berman, Distinguished Professor; Kate Mesa, Lab Manager; Bin Yu, Specialist

Department: Biomolecular Engineering

This patent describes small, properly folded and glycosylated fragments of the HIV envelope glycoprotein, gp120, that appear to be useful components of an HIV vaccine. Over the last decade scientists have identified 3-4 sites on the 510 amino acid envelope protein recognized by protective antibodies. However these sites contain specific sugar molecules (mannose-5) and fail to promote a strong immune responses in the context of the full length gp120 molecule. Thus new ways are required to target antibody responses to these key sites rather than the dozen or more sites recognized by non-protective antibodies. This patent describes properly folded and glycosylated fragments of gp120, and methods for their production. When included in an HIV vaccine, these fragments can focus the immune response to sites recognized by protective antibodies.

Switachable LED Lightbuld

Title: David Munday, Lecturer

Department: Computer Engineering

The US patent office recently issued a patent to a senior design student team and Professor David Munday for inventing a new LED lightbulb capable of multiple brightness settings all within the same bulb. Most commercial LED light bulbs are manufactured for a given brightness level, but this bulb is adjustable through a number of possible controls including onboard buttons, wifi control, and automatic brightness control.

Two Chambered Dual-Pore Device

Holger Schmidt, Associated Dean for Research Holger Schmidt, Associated Dean for Research

Title: Holger Schmidt, Electrical Engineering Associate Dean for Research

Department: Electrical Engineering

Nanopores form the basis of several approaches to next generation DNA sequencing technology. The basic idea behind this is to identify the bases that make up DNA one by one as they move through a nanoscopic opening. This invention describes how to improve control over the molecules to be tested by using two coupled nanopores, and how to implement this principle on a compact semiconductor chip.

Bambam: Parallel Comparative Analysis of High-Throughput Sequencing Data

David Haussler, Distinguished Professor David Haussler, Distinguished Professor

Title: David Haussler, Distinguished Professor, Biomolecular Engineering and Scientific Director, UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute

Department: Biomolecular Engineering, Genomics Institute

The purpose of this invention is to more efficiently compare biological sequences from two distinct samples. The analysis of biological sequence information usually involves the manipulation of enormous data files, which in turn results in long processing times to generate a meaningful comparison between the biological sequences. The inventions described in these two patents provides a more efficient way to compare biological sequences from distinct samples from a patient (e.g. normal tissue vs. tumor tissue) and generate patient-specific treatment instructions based on those sequencesThe purpose of this invention is to more efficiently compare biological sequences from two distinct samples. The analysis of biological sequence information usually involves the manipulation of enormous data files, which in turn results in long processing times to generate a meaningful comparison between the biological sequences. The inventions described in these two patents provides a more efficient way to compare biological sequences from distinct samples from a patient (e.g. normal tissue vs. tumor tissue) and generate patient-specific treatment instructions based on those sequences.

April to June 2017 IRP Patent Awardees

Bambam: Parallel Comparative Analysis of High-Throughput Sequencing Data (two patents)

David Haussler, UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute David Haussler, UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute

Title: David Haussler, Distinguished Professor, Biomolecular Engineering and Scientific Director, UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute

Department: Biomolecular Engineering, Genomics Institute

The purpose of the inventions encompassed by these two patents is to more efficiently compare biological sequences from two distinct samples. The analysis of biological sequence information usually involves the manipulation of enormous data files, which in turn results in long processing times to generate a meaningful comparison between the biological sequences. The inventions described in these two patents provides a more efficient way to compare biological sequences from distinct samples from a patient (e.g. normal tissue vs. tumor tissue) and generate patient-specific treatment instructions based on those sequences. The 9,646,134 patent concerns genomic information while the 9,652,587 patent also encompasses proteomic and transcriptomic information.

January to March 2017 IRP Patent Awardees

Interferometric focusing of guide-stars for direct wavefront sensing

Joel Kubby, Professor of Electrical Engineering Joel Kubby, Professor of Electrical Engineering Xiadong Tao, Assistant Project Scientist — Electrical Engineering Xiadong Tao, Assistant Project Scientist — Electrical Engineering

Title: Joel Kubby (Professor) and Xiaodong Tao (Assistant Project Scientist)

Department: Electrical Engineering

The optimal performance of an optical microscope is difficult to achieve due to aberrations caused by tissues. In order to compensate for these aberrations, we applied adaptive optics with direct wavefront sensing using fluorescent ‘guide-stars’ embedded in tissues for wavefront measurement. A scattering effect within the tissues limits the intensity of the guide star and reduces the signal to noise ratio of wavefront measurement. This patent describes the use of interferometric focusing of excitation light onto a guide-star deep within tissue to increase the fluorescence intensity of the guide-star which in turn overcomes the signal loss caused by scattering.

Nanopipette Apparatus for Manipulating Cells

Nader Pourmand, Associate Professor of Biomolecular Engineering Nader Pourmand, Associate Professor of Biomolecular Engineering

Title: Nader Pourmand, Associate Professor

Department: Biomolecular Science and Engineering

The ability to study the molecular biology of living single cells in heterogeneous cell populations is essential for next generation analysis of cellular circuitry and function. Dr. Pourmand and his team have developed a single-cell interrogation platform based on scanning ion conductance microscopy for continuous sampling of intracellular content from individual cells. Among many other functionalities, for the nanobiopsy, this platform uses a nanopipette to extract cellular material from living cells with minimal disruption of the cellular milieu. Researchers might use this platform to understand cancer and other diseases which might provide a foundation for dynamic subcellular genomic analysis.

October to December 2016 IRP Patent Awardees

Compositions, Devices, Systems, And Methods For Using A Nanopore

Mark Akeson, professor of Biomolecular Engineering Mark Akeson, professor of Biomolecular Engineering

Title: Mark Akeson, Professor

Department: Biomolecular Science & Engineering

The invention is one of a series of patents from the biomolecular engineering department concerning sequencing of DNA using a nanoscale hole or 'nanopore'. When a voltage is applied across the nanopore, DNA is pulled through the hole in single file order. The bases that make up the DNA are read as they transit the pore. In this particular patent, the inventors combined voltage feedback control with an enzyme to precisely regulate movement of the DNA. This results in improved DNA sequencing accuracy.

July to September 2016 IRP Patent Awardees

Faster, Better Genome Assembly

Ed Green's startup, Dovetail Genomics,  opened its doors in summer 2013 in a bio-incubator space on campus, and now employs about 20 people in its own office in Santa Cruz. (Photo by Steve Kurtz) Ed Green's startup, Dovetail Genomics, opened its doors in summer 2013 in a bio-incubator space on campus, and now employs about 20 people in its own office in Santa Cruz. (Photo by Steve Kurtz)

Title: Edward Green, Associate Professor

Department: Biomolecular Engineering

Assembling genomes is like solving a giant, 3 billion-piece jigsaw puzzle. The invention describes a streamlined way to figure out which pieces are near other pieces so the puzzle can be reconstructed more accurately and quickly. Licensed by Dovetail Genomics in Santa Cruz, the invention has been used to assemble the genomes of hundreds of plant and animals. With this information, scientists can begin to unravel the biology inherent in each.

In the spring, several new initiatives from the UC Office of the President will be rolled out across the 10 campuses to further innovation, commercialization, and entrepreneurship and highlight the growing body of research providing public benefit. The IATC office will lead the implementation of these initiatives with various leaders around campus to bring these opportunities to the entire university community.