Institutes

California Institute for Quantitative Biosciences (QB3)

QB3 is a multi-disciplinary research institute at the University of California armed with world-class researchers, state-of-the-art facilities, and a set of entrepreneurial resources designed to accelerate discovery and innovation that benefit society. One of four California Institutes for Science and Innovation, QB3 unites quantitative, biological, and structural scientists at three UC campuses—Berkeley, San Francisco, and Santa Cruz - with private industry collaborators to address problems concerning human health and the environment. QB3 harnesses the quantitative sciences to integrate our understanding of biological systems at all levels of complexity—from atoms and protein molecules to cells, tissues, organs, and the entire organism. At UC Santa Cruz, QB3 is a part of the Center for Biomolecular Science & Engineering.

Institute for the Biology of Stem Cells (IBSC)

Stem cell research at UCSC focuses on the basic biological systems operating in the processes of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. The Institute for the Biology of Stem Cells (IBSC) at UC Santa Cruz encompasses research, training, and facilities to support this work. The institute was made possible by the high quality of biological and engineering research on the UCSC campus and by the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM), which in September 2005 approved funding for UCSC to establish a training program in stem cell research. Funding from CIRM also made possible the UCSC Shared Stem Cell Facility, and other major projects that have supported stem cell research on this campus, such as a major facility award that funded the IBSC space in the new Biomedical Sciences Building. The institute is administered through the Center for Biomolecular Science & Engineering.

Institute for Scalable Scientific Data Management (ISSDM)

The Institute for Scalable Scientific Data Management (ISSDM) is a $1,000,000/year collaboration between the UCSC Jack Baskin School of Engineering (BSOE) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) focused on computing, computation, storage, and data management at scale. The ISSDM supports UCSC/LANL collaborative research projects in petascale  storage, cosmology, machine learning, databases, information trust and  retrieval, and scientific visualization, and telecasts BSOE graduate classes and seminars to LANL.

Information Technologies Institute (ITI)

The Information Technologies Institute (ITI) is a Focused Research Activity (FRA) and is operationally within the Baskin School of Engineering (SOE). ITI's mission is to provide the infrastructure through which its collective members can seek out and attract large scale research dollars, and to advance technology committed to solving grand-challenge national, social, and commercial problems. The Institute promoted the creation of a collaborative effort among four University of California campuses (Berkeley, Davis, Santa Cruz, and Merced) known as CITRIS - Center for Information Technology Research in the Interest of Society. Like ITI, CITRIS works to find solutions to many of the concerns that face all of us today, from monitoring the environment and finding viable, sustainable energy alternatives to simplifying health care delivery and developing secure systems for electronic medical records and remote diagnosis, all of which will ultimately boost economic productivity.

UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute

The UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute provides the framework for the next great leap in the science of genomics. Building on three decades of pioneering genomics research at UC Santa Cruz, the institute unites the university’s efforts that empower the global scientific community to develop breakthroughs in health and evolutionary biology. The institute is building an open-source genomics platform for unlocking the most challenging medical and scientific issues of our time, from decoding cancer to species preservation. This builds on our success with the UCSC Genome Browser, a resource used by more than 130,000 researchers worldwide. The UCSC Genome Browser currently receives more than 1.2 million web page requests a day and is cited in 14,000 scientific publications each year. The institute leads the national and international effort to break down institutional silos where genomic information is now isolated, enables the secure sharing and analysis of genomic data on a global open-source platform, and addresses the bioethical and privacy issues that advances in genomics create for patients, families, physicians, counselors, business, and government.