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David Haussler elected to the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences

David Haussler elected to the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
David Haussler elected to the National Academy of Sciences, American Academy of Arts and Sciences
Wednesday, April 26, 2006

Both the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences announced the inclusion among their members of David Haussler, Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator and professor of biomolecular engineering.

The NAS elected 72 new members and 18 foreign associates from 16 countries. Inclusion in the NAS signifies recognition of distinguished and continuing achievements in original research. One other UCSC faculty member, Stanford Woosley, professor of astronomy and astrophysics, received the honor this year as well. This brings the campus total to twelve Academy members among its current and emeritus faculty. Among these is CBSE affiliate, Harry Noller.

The American Academy of Arts and Sciences elected 175 new fellows and 20 foreign honorary members from 13 countries. The American Academy is an international learned society composed of the world's leading scientists, scholars, artists, business people, and public leaders. Those elected this year include two former presidents of the United States; the Chief Justice of the United States; a Nobel laureate; winners of the Pulitzer Prize in poetry, drama, music, investigative reporting, and non-fiction; a former US poet laureate; and a member of the French Senate. Two other UCSC faculty members were also named among this year's fellows: Harry Berger, emeritus professor of literature and art history, and Harold Wilson, emeritus professor of mathematics. The campus total of academy fellows is now 24, once again including CBSE affiliate Harry Noller.

Haussler's pioneering work in the use of mathematical computer models for analyzing DNA, RNA, and protein sequences led to his pivotal role in the assembly and distribution of the first draft of the human genome sequence and subsequent development of the UCSC Genome Browser. Haussler now focuses on comparative and evolutionary genomics.