Deamer, Akeson awarded grant for faster, cheaper DNA sequencing

Deamer, Akeson awarded grant for faster, cheaper DNA sequencing
Deamer, Akeson awarded grant for faster, cheaper DNA sequencing
Tuesday, August 23, 2005

A team including David Deamer and Mark Akeson has received a major grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI) to develop new technology for genome sequencing. The grant is part of a NHGRI program to develop "revolutionary genome sequencing technologies" that will enable a human-sized genome to be sequenced for $1,000 or less.

Deamer and Akeson, pioneers in the development of nanopore technology for DNA analysis will receive $1.5 million over three years. They will be working with Harvard University researchers Jene Golovchenko (principal investigator of the project) and Daniel Branton and University of New Orleans researcher Stephen Winters-Hilt, who earned his Ph.D. in bioinformatics at UCSC in 2003.

The UCSC group will focus six researchers on developing a general utility instrument for inexpensive sequencing that can also be used for projects to recognize genome variation. They will design novel nanopores articulated with probes to sequentially and directly identify nucleotides in very long fragments of genomic DNA based on their unique electronic signals.