Biomolecular Engineering

The Biomolecular Engineering (BME) Department within the Jack Baskin School of Engineering features an interdisciplinary blend of engineering, biology, chemistry, and statistics designed to foster collaboration with other departments. This blend reflects our vision of the direction that biomedical discovery will take over the next two decades.

The BME Department ladder-rank faculty includes  Mark Akeson, Phil Berman, Angela Brooks, Russ Corbett-Detig, Rebecca DuBois, Camilla Forsberg, Ed Green, David Haussler, Richard Hughey, Kevin Karplus, Daniel Kim, Todd Lowe (17-18 Department Chair), Benedict Paten, Nader Pourmand, Josh Stuart, and Christopher Vollmers . Jonathan Trent, Robert Coffman, Zemin Zhang, Ted Goldstein, David Bernick, and Nathalie Scholler hold adjunct faculty appointments in the department. David Deamer, UC Davis Emeritus Professor of chemistry and biochemistry also holds a research professor appointment with the BME Department.

Members of the BME Department collaborate actively with faculty from other SOE departments, such as Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Applied Mathematics & Statistics and Electrical Engineering, and with the Physical & Biological Sciences departments of MCD Biology, Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Toxicology, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Ocean Sciences.

News

Nanopipette technology wins first place in NIH 'Follow that Cell' challenge

Nader Pourmand, professor of biomolecular engineering in the Baskin School of Engineering at UC Santa Cruz, has won the $300,000 first place prize in the Follow that Cell Challenge organized by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The challenge was issued to accelerate the development of... Read More

Professor David Deamer (Photo by Carolyn Lagattuta)

Did life begin on land rather than in the sea?

For three years, Tara Djokic, a Ph.D. student at the University of New South Wales Sydney, scoured the forbidding landscape of the Pilbara region of Western Australia looking for clues to how ancient microbes could have produced the abundant stromatolites that were discovered there in the 1970s.... Read More

Edmundo Perez working in the lab with Rebecca DuBois, assistant professor of biomolecular engineering. Photo by Karyn Skemp.

Steck Award recipient seeks to solve atomic structure of human astrovirus

Edmundo Perez has been fascinated with viruses since his first biology class at Hartnell Community College. In that Introduction to Biology course, he learned about viruses and became intrigued with their structure. He found out about how they multiply and mutate, and how they spread from organism... Read More

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