Biomolecular Engineering

The Biomolecular Engineering (BME) Department within the Jack Baskin School of Engineering features an interdisciplinary blend of engineering, biology, chemistry, and statistics designed to foster collaboration with other departments. This blend reflects our vision of the direction that biomedical discovery will take over the next two decades.

The BME Department ladder-rank faculty includes  Mark Akeson, Phil Berman, Angela Brooks, Russ Corbett-Detig, Rebecca DuBois, Camilla Forsberg, Ed Green, David Haussler, Richard Hughey, Kevin Karplus, Daniel Kim, Todd Lowe , Benedict Paten, Nader Pourmand, Josh Stuart, and Christopher Vollmers . Robert Coffman, Zemin Zhang, and David Bernick hold adjunct faculty appointments in the department. David Deamer, UC Davis Emeritus Professor of chemistry and biochemistry also holds a research professor appointment with the BME Department.

Members of the BME Department collaborate actively with faculty from other SOE departments and with the Physical & Biological Sciences departments of MCD Biology, Chemistry & Biochemistry, Environmental Toxicology, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, and Ocean Sciences.

News

Good Engineering - logo by Ashley Lavizadeh

Good Engineering: Making a World of Difference

The Baskin School of Engineering graduates nearly a thousand engineering students per year. The holistic education we provide means that our graduates are more than just good engineers. They’re problem-solvers, eager and able to seek collaborative solutions to emerging opportunities and challenges... Read More

Two generations of Oxford Nanopore Technologies MinION

Comprehensive study of UCSC-developed RNA reader appears in Nature Methods

Oxford Nanopore Technologies’s palm-sized DNA and RNA sequencer, the MinION, has been used in Africa during the Ebola epidemic, orbited above planet earth in the International Space Station, and can be found analyzing samples in laboratories all over the world. The nanopore device allows... Read More

David Haussler directs the UC Santa Cruz Genomics Institute.

NIH funds new centers to expand and diversify the human reference genome

New grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) totaling approximately $29.5 million will enable scientists at the University of California, Santa Cruz, and other collaborating institutions to generate and maintain a completely new and comprehensive reference sequence of the human genome... Read More

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